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Studies

The below studies give a non bias evaluation on effectiveness of insoles

Foot orthoses in the prevention of injury in initial military training: a randomized controlled trial

A. Franklyn-Miller, C. Wilson, J. Bilzon, P. McCrory 2010

CONCLUSION: Enertor orthotics used with the military showed a 66% reduction in the risk of lower limb injury.

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A comparison of shoe insole materials in plantar pressure relief

C. Leber, P. Evanski 1986

CONCLUSION: Shock absorbing insoles reduce plantar pressure and can help relieve injuries within the foot.

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Prevention of common overuse injuries by the use of shock absorbing insoles: A prospective study

M. Shcwellness 1990

CONCLUSION: Overuse injuries can be overcome and prevented through the use of insoles.

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The effect of pes cavus on foot pain and plantar pressure

J.Burns et al. 2005

CONCLUSION: Pes Cavus foot types have abnormally high foot presure-time integrals which significantly increases risk of foot pain.

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Running injuries. A review of the epidemiological literature.

van Mechelen 1992

CONCLUSION: Most running injuries occur at the knee due to repetitve movements and hard surfaces.

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Can custom-made biomechanic shoe orthoses prevent problems in the back and lower extremities? A randomized, controlled intervention trial of 146 military conscripts

Larson 2002

CONCLUSION: Customised foot orthotics are more effective than no insole for reducing lower limb injuries, epecially MTSS.

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Orthotic devices in running

D’Ambrosia 1985

CONCLUSION: Success rates of foot orthotics for lower limb over use injuries are reported to be from 70% to 90%.

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Effectiveness of foot orthoses for treatment and prevention of lower limb injuries : a review

Hume 2008

CONCLUSION: Customized semi-rigid FOs have moderate to large beneficial effects in treating and preventing plantar fasciitis and posterior tibial stress fractures, and small to moderate effects in treating patellofemoral pain syndrome.

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Treatment of lower extremity injuries with orthotic shoe inserts. An overview

ML Gross 1993

CONCLUSION: Orthotic shoe inserts are beneficial for a broad range of disorders experienced by runners. Problems related to excessive or prolonged pronation are most amenable to orthotic treatment.

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Effectiveness of foot orthoses for the prevention of lower limb overuse injuries in naval recruits: a randomised controlled trial

Bonanno 2017

CONCLUSION: Prefabricated foot orthoses may be beneficial for reducing the incidence of lower limb injury in naval recruits undertaking defence training.

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The effect of customized insoles on the reduction of postwork discomfort

E Sobel 1, S J Levitz, M A Caselli, P J Christos, J Rosenblum 2001

CONCLUSION: There was a significant reduction in tiredness in the feet at the end of the day after wearing the insoles, but no improvement in back or leg discomfort. At the end of the workday, 68% had less foot discomfort and 60% were more comfortable at work when wearing the insoles.

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